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HomeDistance education : a brave new world?

Distance education : a brave new world?

La formation à distance, résolument ?

Modalities, challenges, opportunities and prospects

Modalités, enjeux, ouvertures et perspectives

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Published on Friday, December 17, 2021 by Céline Guilleux

Summary

When the closure of schools and universities was imposed by governments across the globe to curb the pandemic in March 2020, the use of digital tools and platforms became the only way to ensure continuity of teaching and learning. Thus, a form of emergency distance teaching unexpectedly appeared and was imposed on teachers, learners and all the staff who provide pedagogical, pastoral and administrative support, who create content and who manage logistics. This emergency form of distance teaching and hybrid teaching modes are still widespread around the world today. This event will be dedicated to the challenges and opportunities of distance education in the time of Covid-19 and its aftermath.

Announcement

Argument

The French National Centre for Distance Education (Centre National d’Enseignement à Distance, CNED) through its École d’ingénierie de la formation à distance (EIFAD), the French academic journal Distance and mediation of knowledge (Distances et médiations des savoirs, DMS) and the Open University UK are pleased to announce a bilingual French-English conference on the challenges and opportunities of distance education in the time of Covid-19 and its aftermath, Distance education: a brave new world? The conference will take place online on 20 and 21 October 2022.

When the closure of schools and universities was imposed by governments across the globe to curb the pandemic in March 2020, the use of digital tools and platforms became the only way to ensure continuity of teaching and learning. Thus, a form of emergency distance teaching unexpectedly appeared and was imposed on teachers, learners and all the staff who provide pedagogical, pastoral and administrative support, who create content and who manage logistics. This emergency form of distance teaching and hybrid teaching modes are still widespread around the world today.

This real-time and wide-scale phenomenon has had successes and failures. It has highlighted the diversity of models of distance education and their relative effectiveness, their various affordances and shortcomings, as well as the issue of their sustainability.

It also seems to have profoundly changed individuals’ perceptions of distance learning within and outside educational institutions, regarding its advantages and disadvantages, its constraints and opportunities.

In addition, the recent shift to distance education has transformed the issue of the remote mediation of knowledge - previously confined to experts - into a world-wide concern of public interest, widely publicised, discussed and commented on in the press as well as on social media. In some countries, remote or distance education has even become a quest for national prestige, through the promotion of flexible modes of teaching and learning that some other countries’ education systems have not been able to achieve so far.

Finally, this phenomenon has severely tested the functioning of traditional education systems. It has changed the dynamics between public and private education providers, mainstream platforms and other information and communication tools. It has also accelerated the development of EdTech and strengthened the processes of industrialisation and privatisation of education on an unprecedented scale.

Conference themes: an open and diverse approach

This conference is organised by two pioneers in the field, the French National Centre for Distance Education and The Open University, on the initiative and with the support of the French academic journal Distances et médiations des savoirs (Distance and mediation of knowledge).

The aim of the conference is to enable a scientific assessment of what has happened within the different contexts described above. To foster openness and promote rich dialogue, the multi- and interdisciplinary conference will be organised around four key themes:

1) Developments in distance education policies and strategies

  • Remote and online learning as a new focus for national policies
  • Strategic and political choices of distance learning institutions
  • National and international competition and/or collaboration
  • Organisational flexibility v. institutional rigidity
  • Decision-making process and awareness

2) Transformation in teaching and learning

  • Daily administrative organisation and risk assessment for distance education providers
  • Well-established skills and competences v. new demands
  • Support systems and adaptation of organisational structures
  • Traditional v. new roles and tasks of teachers, learners and administrative and support staff
  • Empowerment of and new dynamics among stakeholders
  • Public and private sectors and the role of open educational resources and practices
  • Teachers’ creativity v. process constraints
  • Lessons learnt

3) Educational models, configurations and practices

  • Well-established teaching methodologies and new practices
  • Traditional, new, tested and forthcoming models of distance, blended and online learning
  • Instructional design, content development and learning design
  • Convergence and divergence between practitioners and researchers
  • Changing boundaries between face-to-face, blended and online modes
  • Local and national specificities

4) Perception of distance education and its mission

  • Old and new perceptions of distance education
  • Positioning in relation to traditional education
  • Reinforcement of social inequalities
  • New economies of distance education
  • Sustainability

The conference welcomes submissions from practitioners, researchers, decision-makers and students.

The conference aims to attract educators, researchers and teachers who are focused on the pedagogy of distance education and technology-enhanced teaching and learning, students and decision-makers in the field, and, more broadly anyone who has an interest in remote and online learning, particularly within the context of the pandemic. The conference is open to anyone working in institutions of distance education as well as institutions practising hybrid modes of teaching and learning, and to traditional institutions that only delivered face-to-face education until the pandemic and had to unexpectedly move to remote teaching.

Submissions

Abstracts are welcome in any areas of distance education related to the conference themes. Papers presenting theoretical, methodological or empirical research, case-studies and analyses of experiences are particularly welcome. Papers may therefore present testimonials and reflective practice as well as scientific contributions that adopt an analytical and theoretical lens.

  • Abstracts may be submitted in French or in English.
  • Abstracts must be between 300 to 600 words including references (if required).
  • Conference presentations will last 10-15 minutes with 5 minutes for questions to maximise the number of sessions and increase the diversity of views and experiences.
  • The scientific committee may ask authors to amend their accepted abstracts before their publication on the conference website. Authors will be asked to submit short papers (3,000 to 4,000 words including references) for publication on the conference website before the conference.
  • Selected conference proceedings will be published in a special issue of the journal Distances et médiations des savoirs (Distance and mediation of knowledge) based on the conference themes. Authors who wish to submit full papers for the special issue will be provided with further information after the conference.

The submitted abstracts will be evaluated by members of the conference scientific committee through a double-blind review process.

To submit your abstract please go to the conference website: https://distance-2022.sciencesconf.org

Important dates for authors

  • 28 October 2021 Call for papers opens
  • 31 January 2022 Deadline for submissions of abstracts (300 to 600 words including references)

  • 28 March 2022 Notifications to authors (including possible revisions)
  • 15 June 2022 Deadline for submission of short papers (3,000 to 4,000 words including references)
  • 30 September 2022 Publication of short papers prior to the conference
  • 20-21 October 2022 Online conference
  • After the conference (date to be confirmed) Opportunity to submit full papers for publication in DMS (details to be confirmed)

Scientific Committee

  • Lina ADINOLFI, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Inma ALVAREZ, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Sam AUSTEN, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Jacqueline BAXTER, Faculty of Business and Law, The Open University, UK.
  • Bernard BLANDIN, Laboratoire d’Innovation Numérique pour les Entreprises et les Apprentissages, CESI, DMS, France.
  • Philippe BONFILS, i3M, université de Toulon, DMS, France.
  • Éric BRUILLARD, EDA - Éducation, Discours et Apprentissages, université Paris Descartes, DMS, France.
  • Jean-François CERISIER, TECHNE – TECHnologies Numériques pour l’Education, université de Poitiers, DMS, France.
  • Bernadette CHARLIER, Did@cTic – Centre de didactique universitaire, université de Fribourg, DMS, Suisse.
  • Tim COUGHLAN, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Bruno DE LIĖVRE, Sciences et Technologie de l'éducation - FPSE - université de Mons-Hainaut, DMS, Belgique.
  • Brigitte DENIS, CRIFA – Centre de recherche sur l’instrumentation, la formation et l’apprentissage, université de Liège, DMS, Belgique.
  • Christian DEPOVER, UTE – Unité de technologie de l’éducation, université de Mons-Hainaut, DMS, Belgique.
  • Philippe DESSUS, LaRAC, université Grenoble Alpes, DMS, France.
  • Bruno DEVAUCHELLE, TECHNE – TECHnologies Numériques pour l’Education, université de Poitiers, DMS, France.
  • Jérôme DEVAUX, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Jo FAYRAM, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Rob FARROW, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Joris FELDER, Did@cTic – Centre de didactique universitaire, université de Fribourg, DMS, Suisse.
  • Rebecca FERGUSSON, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Aurélien FIEVEZ, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, DMS.
  • Cédric FLUCKIGER, CIREL – université de Lille, DMS, France.
  • Viviane GLIKMAN, INRP, Cnam, Gehfa, DMS, France.
  • Monique GRANDBASTIEN, LORIA – Laboratoire lorrain de recherche en informatique et ses applications, université de Lorraine, Nancy, DMS, France.
  • Regine HAMPEL, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Sarah HEISER, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • France HENRI, Télé-université du Québec, Montréal, DMS, Canada.
  • Lesley HOGGART, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Séverine HUBSCHER-DAVIDSON, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Thomas HÜLSMANN, Center for Lifelong Learning, Carl von Ossietzky Universität, Oldenburg, DMS, Allemagne.
  • Francisco INIESTO, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Alain JAILLET, Laboratoire BONHEURS, université de Cergy-Pontoise, DMS, France.
  • Katherine JEWITT, School of Early Childhood, Youth and Sports, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Sally JORDAN, Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, The Open University, UK.
  • Noémie JORIS, Centre de Recherche sur l’Instrumentation, la Formation et l’Apprentissage, université de Liège, DMS, Belgique.
  • Qian KAN, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Karen KEAR, Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, The Open University, UK.
  • Vassilis KOMIS, Educational Sciences & Early Childhood Education, University of Patras, DMS, Grèce.
  • Agnes KUKULSKA-HULME, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Sarah LEMARCHAND, Pôle d'appui aux pratiques pédagogiques et à l'enseignement, Télécom Paris Tech, DMS, France.
  • Dominique LIAUTARD, Consultante Des Univers connectés Activateur d'usages numériques, DMS, France.
  • Claude LISHOU, Prof des universités de classe exceptionnelle ESP/UCAD, Dakar, DMS, Sénégal.
  • François MANGENOT, LIDILEM – Laboratoire de linguistique et didactique des langues étrangères et maternelles, université de Grenoble, DMS, France.
  • Pascal MARQUET, LISEC – Laboratoire interuniversitaire des sciences de l'éducation et de la communication, université de Strasbourg, DMS, France.
  • Liz MARR, The Open University, UK.
  • Luc MASSOU, CREM-Centre de recherche sur les médiations, université de Lorraine, DMS, France.
  • Pierre MŒGLIN, Institut Universitaire de France, Maison des sciences de l’homme Paris-Nord, université Paris 13, DMS, France.
  • Graciela PADOANI, École d’ingénierie de la formation à distance, CNED, DMS, France.
  • Cathia PAPI, Télé-université du Québec, Québec, DMS, Canada.
  • Françoise PAQUIENSEGUY, ELICO, SCIENCES-PO Lyon, DMS, France.
  • Claire PELTIER, Faculté des sciences de l’éducation, université Laval, Québec, DMS, Canada.
  • Daniel PERAYA, TECFA, université de Genève, DMS, Suisse.
  • Leigh-Anne PERRYMAN, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Laurent PETIT, GRIPIC - université Paris Sorbonne, ESPE de l’académie de Paris, DMS, France.
  • Christine PLEINES, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Gérard PUIMATTO, Conseil en ingénierie et technologies avancées, en stratégie de l’innovation numérique, DMS, France.
  • Hélène PULKER, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, DMS, UK.
  • Jonathan RIX, School of Early Childhood, Youth and Sports, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Caroline RIZZA, Département SES, Institut Interdisciplinaire de l'Innovation, Telecom ParisTech, université Paris Saclay, DMS, France.
  • Sylvaine ROI, université confédérale Léonard de Vinci, FFFOD, DMS, France.
  • Claire SAUNDERS, School of Early Childhood, Youth and Sports, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Eileen SCANLON, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Jane SEALE, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Aude SEURAT, LabSic – Laboratoire des sciences de l’information et de la communication, université Paris 13, Paris, DMS, France.
  • Kieron SHEEHY, School of Early Childhood, Youth and Sports, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Prithvi SHRESHA, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Joan SIMONS, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Stephanie SINCLAIR, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, The Open University, UK.
  • Uschi STICKLER, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Françoise THIBAULT, université Paris-Nanterre, DMS, France.
  • Gaëtan TREMBLAY, GRICIS – Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la communication, l’information et la société, université du Québec à Montréal, DMS, Canada.
  • Elodie VIALLETON, School of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies, The Open University, UK.
  • Martine VIDAL, CNED, DMS, France.
  • Emmanuelle VOULGRE, EDA - Éducation, Discours et Apprentissages, université Paris Descartes, DMS, France.
  • Martin WELLER, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Denise WHITELOCK, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK.
  • Freda WOLFENDEN, School of Early Childhood, Youth and Sports, Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Languages Studies, The Open University, UK.

Places

  • Poitiers, France (86)

Event format

Full online event


Date(s)

  • Monday, January 31, 2022

Keywords

  • distance, mediation, savoir, apprentissage, FAD, numérique, digital, knowledge, distance learning, education, covid19

Contact(s)

  • Sandrine Lavallée
    courriel : CNED-Colloques [at] ac-cned [dot] fr

Reference Urls

Information source

  • Sandrine Lavallée
    courriel : CNED-Colloques [at] ac-cned [dot] fr

To cite this announcement

« Distance education : a brave new world? », Call for papers, Calenda, Published on Friday, December 17, 2021, https://calenda.org/929934

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